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Popular, political and media discourses frame the issue of migration and shape how and when it enters the public and political consciousness. These discourses are of crucial importance as they influence both the general public’s perception of migration and the policies which regulate both the act of migration itself and migrant residents.

Public and Political Discourses of Migration brings together an interdisciplinary group of established and emerging scholars, whose work interrogates the relationship between discourse and migration. Through the application of a variety of theoretical lenses drawn from the broad canon of discourse studies, each contribution unpicks the productive power of discourse in shaping the reality of migration, migration policy and migrant lives in the twenty-first century. The cases examined emerge, as do their authors, from a wide spectrum of national, political and cultural contexts. They are linked by their fundamental questioning of ‘common sense’ and ahistorical approaches to migration. They address the question of whose interests are served by prevailing discourses and the structures they underpin. Ultimately, they ‘make strange’ accepted ‘truths’ regarding migration in the twenty-first century.


Dedication / Acknowledgments / List of Figures / List of Tables / 1. In the Frame? Discourses of Migration: An Introduction to the Volume, Aileen Dillane, Martin J. Power, Amanda Haynes, Eoin Devereux and James Carr / 2. The Incorrigible Subject of the Border Spectacle, Nicholas de Genova / 3. Framing Lampedusa: Between Alarmism and Pietism - The Landing Issue in Italian Media Coverage of Migration, Marco Bruno / 4. “You Can’t Have Muslim Irish Children”. Media, Islamophobia and Ireland: Constructing Different Shades of Green., James Carr / 5. Drawing Discursive Boundaries in U.S. News Coverage of the “Honour Killing” of Noor Almaleki Autumn M. Reed / 6. Emotive Strategies and Affective Tactics in ‘Islam Night’, Tuuli Lähdesmäki and Tuija Saresma / 7. Being Part of the Irish ‘We’: The Experience of Return Migration for the Second Generation Irish From Britain, Sarah Hannafin / 8. Irregular Migrants in Ireland and the United States of America: Discursive Representations by Irish Parliamentary Members, Elaine Burroughs / 9. Explaining EU Migrant Workers: Irish Political Interventions in Public Discourse, Martin J. Power, Amanda Haynes and Eoin Devereux / 10. Print Media Framings of Those Blonde Roma Children, Aileen Marron, Ann Marie Joyce, James Carr, Eoin Devereux, Michael Breen, Martin J. Power and Amanda Haynes / 11. The “Salsa Factor”: Music and Dance as Identity among Undocumented Latino Labour Migrants in Israel, Moshe Morad / 12. “An Affirmation of Key Postmodernist Tendencies”: Musics, Apolitics, and Placebo Nostalgias Within the Greek-Speaking Diaspora of Birmingham (UK), Michalis Poupazis / 13. Frame and Agency: The Public Performance of a North West Cameroonian Group in Ireland, Sheryl Lynch / 14. Politics of Public Representation: A Franco-German Museum Exhibition on Images of Immigrants, Yannik Porsché / 15. Welcoming Nations? Hospitality as a Proxy for National Identity: A Consideration of British and Scottish Contexts, Emma Hill / 16. No Nos Vamos, Nos Echan: Multimodal Framing of Spanish Youth Unemployment and Labour Migration in Social Media, Uta Helfrich and Ana Mancera Rueda / 17. Conclusion: Opportunities for Resistance Through Discourse, Eoin Devereux, Aileen Dillane, Martin J. Power, Amanda Haynes and James Carr / List of Contributors / Bibliography / Index
This outstanding collection, skilfully edited with thematic clarity and analytic vision, is a major contribution to migration studies. Fusing intellectual gravitas with impressive political commitment, the book will serve as a benchmark for future analyses of the relationship between migration and the unsettling politics of representation, as well as an important and instructive resource for students new to the field.
Tom Slater, Reader in Urban Geography, University of Edinburgh
At the present moment in which migration has fully enveloped the global everyday, this book could not be more timely. The counterpoint of ethnography, discourse analysis, and critical theory draws the reader to the frontlines of the struggles to cross borders and fight racism, which increasingly form the worlds we all share with those in search of asylum and home.
Philip V. Bohlman, Mary Werkman Distinguished Service Professor of Music and the Humanities, The University of Chicago
Migration is certainly not a new phenomenon in our world. However, as this excellent volume illustrates in much detail, politics (in Europe and beyond) and related hegemonic discourses prefer constructing negative scenarios and creating fear of the ‘stranger’. In-depth case-studies provide much evidence that closing borders has become more important than the acknowledgement of a diverse globalized environment. Anybody interested in these most complex developments should read this outstanding book!
Ruth Wodak, Emeritus Distinguished Professor and Chair in Discourse Studies, Lancaster University
From the perspective of social sciences in Hungary and Central and Eastern Europe, an interesting feature of the book is its open and explicit positionality … Such a transparent approach can be exemplary in a region where social scientists still too often think or at least work under the premise that objectivity is always necessary, or even desirable … Whatever direction European migration debates and policies will be taking in the future, it is clear that the topic of refugees and migrants will need continued engagement by social scientists and others. In a climate of hardened debates, the present volume is an important a contribution.
Péter Balogh, Institute for Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Amanda Haynes is a senior lecturer in the Department of Sociology at the University of Limerick.

Martin J. Power is a lecturer in the Department of Sociology at the University of Limerick.

Eoin Devereux is a senior lecturer in the Department of Sociology at the University of Limerick.

Aileen Dillane is an ethnomusicologist based in the Irish World Academy at the University of Limerick.

James Carr is a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Limerick.

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